News Release Archive - 2002

“Global Apartheid” for Christmas? * Africa * Iraq

SALIH BOOKER
Over the weekend the White House announced the cancellation of President Bush’s January trip to Africa. Booker, executive director of Africa Action, said today: “The administration thinks they’ve addressed enough Black issues with the replacement of Lott and so they callously dump Africa again. The Bush administration is disinterested in Africa aside from oil imports and the use of African territory in Washington’s ‘war on terrorism.’ The U.S. government continues shamelessly to limit funding for AIDS programs in Africa and supports the pharmaceutical companies’ efforts to enforce draconian patent laws against poor countries seeking affordable medicines.” The Guardian in Britain reported this weekend that Dick Cheney, at the behest of pharmaceutical giants, blocked a global agreement (against the will of all 140 other countries in the World Trade Organization) to provide cheap drugs to poor countries. Booker said: “For Christmas, the Bush administration is reinforcing global apartheid.”
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DENIS HALLIDAY
Former head of the UN oil-for-food program in Iraq and former Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, Halliday has just returned from Cairo, where he attended a conference on Iraq. He said today: “After my very recent visits to Tunisia and Egypt, it is evident that the Arab community now perceives the American people along with Washington as being responsible for the terrible impact of U.S. foreign policy on the Palestinians and on the people of Iraq. My previous experience when visiting Iraq last year was that the Iraqis distinguish between Washington policies and the people of America. Now, in the light of … the Republican victory last November, Americans as a whole are being held liable. This is understandable and needs to be conveyed to American listeners and viewers….”
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SIMONE CAMPBELL
A lawyer and Catholic nun, Campbell is executive director of JERICHO, an interfaith social justice group in California. She has just returned from Iraq, where she traveled with a religious delegation. Campbell said today: “There are so many things I didn’t know before I got to Iraq. I didn’t know the U.S. government has not talked to the Iraqi government since before the Gulf War. I didn’t know how devastating the economic sanctions have been. You have dentists working as bellhops in hotels because people can’t afford a dentist in Iraq. We have destroyed a country’s economy. I didn’t realize that cancer treatment protocols are not getting into the country in a useful fashion; I didn’t realize that the depleted uranium we used has apparently led to heightened cancer rates and that the U.S. blocked the World Health Organization from doing a study.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Interviews on Fallout From Iraqi Disclosures

JACQUELINE CABASSO
ANDREW LICHTERMAN
Cabasso is the executive director of the Western States Legal Foundation, a nuclear disarmament advocacy group in California; Lichterman is the program director. They have co-authored a series of papers on nuclear weapons and related high-tech weaponry; the most recent is “The End of Disarmament and the Arms Races to Come.” Cabasso said today: “Whether Iraq still has weapons of mass destruction remains to be seen. Meanwhile its chief accuser, the United States, is blatantly brandishing its own. The ‘National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction,’ released by the White House just last week, combines the worst features of the ‘Nuclear Posture Review’ and the September 2002 ‘National Security Strategy of the United States’ by openly threatening the first use of nuclear weapons. This deadly international double standard is a recipe for endless arms racing and endless death and destruction. The Bush administration has turned the concept of non-proliferation on its head and made a mockery of international law. If having weapons of mass destruction and a history of using them is a criteria, then surely the United States must pose the greatest threat to humanity that has ever existed. Sustainable global security will require the elimination of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons — without exception.”
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ANDREAS ZUMACH
A Geneva-based UN correspondent with the German newspaper Die Tageszeitung, Zumach has obtained an unedited copy of Iraq’s 12,000-page report to the United Nations, including portions on how Iraq acquired its weapon capability from Germany, the U.S. and others.
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PHYLLIS BENNIS
A fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies and author of the new book Before and After: U.S. Foreign Policy and the September 11th Crisis, Bennis is available for interviews on Iraq and the UN as well as U.S. companies that helped arm Iraq’s weapons program. She said today: “U.S. government officials do not have the authority to declare a nation in material breach….”
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JEREMY SCAHILL
Scahill is an independent journalists who spent five out of the last eight months reporting from the ground in Iraq where he interviewed numerous Iraqi and UN officials. In August, Scahill broke the story of Donald Rumsfeld’s meeting with Saddam Hussein and other Iraqi officials in Baghdad in 1983 and again in 1984. Scahill said today: “Just as Iraq was beginning its use of chemical weapons, Rumsfeld was not trying to stop it, but was restoring diplomatic relations. Now, Iraq’s use of these weapons is being used as a pretext for massive invasion.”
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NATHANIEL HURD
Consultant to the Mennonite United Nations office, Hurd is in contact with various diplomats at the United Nations. He notes that the U.S. government has refused to give UNMOVIC information it claims to have on Iraqi weapons, though UN resolution 1441 calls on member states to do so.

For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

* Penn’s Words Distorted * Views on Dissent

The following statement has been released by Sean Penn’s office:

In sharp contrast to some misleading claims — primarily emanating from media outlets owned by Rupert Murdoch — the statements made by Sean Penn about Iraq have been clear and straightforward. In his open letter to President Bush, printed in The Washington Post on October 18, 2002, Mr. Penn wrote: “There can be no acceptance of the criminal viciousness of the tyrant, Saddam Hussein.” As has been widely reported by responsible American media organizations, Sean Penn conducted himself with care and sensitivity to his fellow Americans while in Iraq.

Sean Penn is a strong believer in the principles that went into the founding of his country. As he told a news conference in Baghdad on Sunday, “I believe in the Constitution of the United States, and the American people.” Describing himself as “privileged to have lived a life under our Constitution that has allowed me to dream and prosper,” Mr. Penn added: “In response to these privileges I feel, both as an American and as a human being, the obligation to accept some level of personal accountability for the policies of my government, both those I support and any that I may not.” He cares enough about human life to challenge our leaders to work towards a peaceful resolution to an obviously complicated issue.

It is the very foundation of this country, for which Sean Penn cares deeply, to encourage open discussion and express opinions, no matter their popularity. As fortunate, free-thinking citizens of the United States of America, we should be encouraged to sort through our own version of propaganda as it appears in mainstream media. Challenging ideas and policies is as American as it gets.

The official Iraq news agency’s misrepresentation of what Mr. Penn said at his news conference in Baghdad is hardly shocking. Propaganda exists and will be used to suit the perpetrator’s advantage. The fact that some — whether the New York Post or the official Iraqi news agency — are likely to distort his words will not prevent Sean Penn from continuing to speak out.

[Norman Solomon, executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, accompanied Penn to Iraq and is available for a limited number of interviews.]

HOWARD ZINN
Professor emeritus of political science at Boston University, Zinn is author of numerous books including the widely praised A People’s History of the United States. He said today: “People who are accusing the anti-war movement of being soft on Saddam simply aren’t listening to the anti-war movement. Every statement I’ve seen makes clear that Saddam Hussein is a tyrant….”
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ROBERT McCHESNEY
Author of Rich Media, Poor Democracy, McChesney said today: “Traditionally the news media have had a tendency to reflect those in power, especially on foreign policy. Dissident voices are routinely marginalized, trivialized, distorted and even ridiculed, if not ignored altogether. History shows in the case of the Gulf War, Vietnam War, Korean War, Spanish-American War, these dissidents have been accurate more often than not…”
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ROBERT JENSEN
Professor of journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, Jensen is author of the book Writing Dissent and the pamphlet “Citizens of the Empire: Thoughts on Patriotism, Dissent, and Hope.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Sean Penn Arrives in Baghdad for Three-Day Visit

The actor and director Sean Penn arrived in Baghdad on Friday morning at the start of a three-day visit to Iraq.

“By the invitation of the Institute for Public Accuracy, I have the privileged opportunity to pursue a deeper understanding of this frightening conflict,” Penn said in a statement released in Washington and Baghdad on Friday. “I would hope that all Americans will embrace information available to them outside conventional channels. As a father, an actor, a filmmaker, and a patriot, my visit to Iraq is for me a natural extension of my obligation (at least attempt) to find my own voice on matters of conscience.”

Penn’s visit to Iraq has been organized by the Institute for Public Accuracy, a national U.S. organization of policy analysts with offices in San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

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For further information, contact:

IN BAGHDAD — Norman Solomon, Executive Director, Institute for Public Accuracy

IN THE UNITED STATES — At the Institute: Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

For more IPA news releases on Iraq and war, visit:
www.accuracy.org/war-releases

Afghanistan: What’s Happening?

MARC HEROLD
Herold, a professor at the University of New Hampshire, is the author of the just-released report “A Dossier on Civilian Victims of United States’ Aerial Bombing of Afghanistan: A Comprehensive Accounting.” He said today: “More than 3,700 civilians have been killed in Afghanistan directly from U.S. bombs since Oct. 7. For example, on Oct. 11, two U.S. jets bombed the mountain village of Karam, comprised of 60 mud houses, during dinner and evening prayer time, killing 100 to 160 people. On Dec. 1, as part of the intense bombing campaign of Tora Bora, B-52s bombed the villages Kama Ado and Khan-e-Mairjuddin, killing at least 100 people in each village, yet the Pentagon that night claimed ‘It just did not happen.'” Herold added: “The U.S. military has hit electrical and telephone facilities, news outlets, fuel supplies, hospitals, religious schools and mosques.”

* Food Aid: “Time is Running Out…”

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SARAH ZAIDI
ROGER NORMAND
Zaidi, who recently returned from the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, is research director of the Center for Economic and Social Rights. She said today: “Time is running out for thousands of civilians facing starvation due to violations of the right to food by all parties to the Afghanistan conflict. The collapse of the Taliban was expected to ease the food crisis. But instead, a deadly combination of lawlessness among Northern Alliance factions and closed borders by neighboring states is continuing to block life-saving aid from reaching millions of destitute civilians.” Normand, CESR’s executive director, said today: “The United States has the means to prevent the impending catastrophe but refuses to act forcefully on the crisis. There is something wrong when our government can pressure Afghanistan and its neighbors to permit the establishment of major new U.S. military bases but not the free passage of humanitarian aid to save the lives of starving civilians.”
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DEBORAH JAMES
MEDEA BENJAMIN
A member of a Global Exchange women’s delegation that has just returned from Afghanistan, James said today: “As an American in Afghanistan, I was wholly unprepared for the level of poverty and desperation I witnessed among Afghan refugees…. Many Afghans urge the immediate deployment of UN peacekeepers, but the U.S. government is still hindering such attempts. Crucially, women must be incorporated into the new government.” Benjamin, founding director of Global Exchange, was on the same delegation with her daughter Arlen. Benjamin said today: “The U.S. bombing campaign, while helping to defeat the oppressive Taliban regime, has exacerbated the humanitarian crisis in two ways. First, hundreds of thousands of people, terrified by the bombs, have fled their villages and swelled the ranks of the refugee population. Second … after the bombing began, humanitarian agencies pulled staff from the country and closed or severely curtailed their operations.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Iraqi Documents and U.S. Response

HANS VON SPONECK
Former head of the United Nations oil-for-food program in Iraq, Von Sponeck was recently in Iraq and is currently in Geneva. He said today: “The U.S. government’s actions amount to a campaign of severe political harassment. They should give Hans Blix the time to assess the documents. Bush disparaging Iraq when it is complying with total access for the weapons inspectors shows a disregard for the reality on the ground. The U.S. controlling of documents and sharing them with only the permanent members of the Security Council and not the 10 rotating members further intensifies the existing caste system within the UN Security Council.”
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JAMES PAUL
Executive director of the Global Policy Forum, which monitors policy-making at the United Nations, Paul is author of a series of papers on Iraq.
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JACQUELINE CABASSO
Executive director of Western States Legal Foundation, a nuclear disarmament advocacy organization, Cabasso recently led a “Citizen Weapons Inspection Team” to the gates of the U.S. nuclear weapons laboratory in Livermore, California. She said today: “The Bush administration’s claim that it has ‘evidence’ of continued development of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction appears to be the last refuge of scoundrels. While UNMOVIC and IAEA weapons inspectors are reporting full cooperation from the Iraqis, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld is alleging that the inspectors won’t be able to find evidence of Iraqi WMD programs…. The U.S. determination to wage war against Iraq is becoming more transparent with each passing day. And U.S. hypocrisy is at an all-time high given its own dismal record on international treaty obligations and nuclear use plans.”
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JOHN R. MACARTHUR
Author of Second Front: Censorship and Propaganda in the Gulf War, MacArthur said today: “Virtually everything the Bush administration does is calculated and much is based on lies and half truths. The administration repeated over and over that there was a meeting between Mohamed Atta and an Iraqi official. There is no evidence for this, but according to a poll by the Council on Foreign Relations, a majority of Americans still think this is true…. [During the Gulf War] the most spectacular charge then was that Iraqi soldiers had pulled babies from incubators in Kuwaiti hospitals, and stolen the incubators. The story was false, but wasn’t completely refuted until well after the Gulf War. Likewise, in August 1990, the White House asserted the existence of military satellite photographs that showed Iraqi troops massed on the Saudi Arabian border — preparing, said the White House, to invade that kingdom. These photos have never been made public, probably because they don’t exist. Genuine commercial-satellite photographs of the Kuwait-Saudi Arabia border from that time, published in the St. Petersburg Times, showed no Iraqi troops along the frontier…. Recently, Bush cited an IAEA report that Iraq was ‘six months away from developing a weapon. I don’t know what more evidence we need.’ The IAEA responded that not only was there no new report, ‘there’s never been a report’ asserting that Iraq was six months away from constructing a nuclear weapon….”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Iraq: * Medicine * Inspectors * ‘No-Fly’ Zones

DANNY MULLER
RAMZI KYSIA
In Baghdad: KATHY KELLY
Muller, Kysia and Kelly are members of the Voices in the Wilderness campaign. The U.S. government has given Voices delegates until tomorrow to pay $30,000 in penalties for taking medicine to Iraq.
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ALICE SLATER
Director of the Global Resource Action Center for the Environment, Slater said today: “No one is talking about our own violations of obligations to disarm, for example under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Our government is violating international law, even as it accuses Saddam Hussein of doing so. We see U.S. officials trying to upset the current disarmament process in Iraq; they are looking for the slightest excuse to invade Iraq…. The U.S. undermined the biological weapons disarmament process, saying that it was overly intrusive on corporate rights of privacy; the U.S. ousted the head of the chemical weapons inspections process, in effect because he was doing too good a job.”
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WILLIAM RIVERS PITT
Author of the new book (with Scott Ritter) War on Iraq: What Team Bush Doesn’t Want You to Know, Pitt said today: “Iraq does not retain the functional capability to create weapons of mass destruction. The previous weapons inspectors destroyed a great deal, and any weapons that Iraq might have been able to hide have been degraded. The inspectors will do their job to make sure that the country is not a threat. The claim that Saddam Hussein has connections to Al-Qaeda is laughable. He is a secular dictator. Bin Laden has said that he would like to see Hussein dead. Saddam does not present a threat to the U.S. — his chief interest is his own self-preservation and he knows attacking the U.S. would destroy him. A major attack on Iraq would result in resentment and more terrorism here at home.”
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MICHAEL RATNER
President of the Center for Constitutional Rights, Ratner said today: “Iraq’s alleged firing on U.S. and British warplanes is not, contrary to the U.S. position, a breach of the newly passed UN Security Council Resolution 1441. Paragraph 8 of that resolution decides only that ‘Iraq shall not take or threaten hostile acts’ against those persons upholding ‘any Council resolution.’ Even assuming paragraph 8 applies to non-inspection type resolutions, there is no resolution that authorizes U.S. and British warplanes to fly over the sovereign territory of Iraq. In 1991 the U.N. did pass Resolution 688 which demanded that Iraq stop the repression of the civilian population and particularly the Kurds. This resolution did not mention ‘no-fly’ zones nor did it specify any enforcement actions. So the U.S. and British warplanes should not be flying over Iraq at all…. Under international law, Iraq has a right to defend its sovereign territory. Also, even were 688 somehow impliedly to authorize the flights for the purpose of protecting the Iraqi population, that purpose has become a pretext. In an October 3 New York Times article it was acknowledged that U.S. pilots were using southern Iraq for ‘practice runs, mock strikes and real attacks’ against a variety of targets. In other words, they are using the territory of Iraq to practice for the planned war.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Behind the War Lobby

JONATHAN GRANOFF
Director of the Global Security Institute, Granoff said today: “Richard Perle’s recent statements that the U.S. is determined to go to war regardless of Iraqi compliance with the weapons inspectors subverts the international system as well as the Constitution.” The Mirror in London reported on Nov. 20 that Richard Perle, head of the Pentagon’s Defense Policy Review Board, in a meeting with British members of parliament, “admitted the U.S. would attack Iraq even if UN inspectors fail to find weapons.” The article quoted a British member of parliament: “This makes a mockery of the whole process and exposes America’s real determination to bomb Iraq.” Granoff added: “Perle’s remarks contradict Bush’s and Powell’s statements on what triggers war.”
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JASON VEST
Vest is author of the Nation magazine article “The Men from JINSA and CSP” about the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs and the Center for Security Policy.
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WILLIAM HARTUNG
MICHELLE CIARROCCA
Hartung is a senior research fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School; Ciarrocca is a research associate with the group. They co-authored a report on U.S. military spending and security assistance since 9/11. Hartung said today: “The Bush administration’s strategy of ‘preemptive war’ in Iraq is the brainchild of a small circle of conservative think tanks and weapons lobbying groups like the Project for a New American Century (PNAC), whose members have been pressing this approach for over a decade. In the run-up to the 2000 presidential election, PNAC published a report on ‘Rebuilding America’s Defenses’ which has served as a blueprint for the Bush/Rumsfeld Pentagon’s military strategy, up to and including the coining of terms such as ‘regime change.’ PNAC’s founding document — a unilateralist call for a return to the ‘peace through strength’ policies of the early Reagan years — was signed by Paul Wolfowitz, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and numerous others who have gone on to become major players in the Bush national security team. Like the Coalition for the Liberation of Iraq, a newly formed group of current and former Washington insiders designed to promote the Bush administration’s policy in Iraq, PNAC draws its support from a tightly-knit network of conservative ideologues, right-wing foundations, and major defense contractors. Bruce P. Jackson, a former vice president at Lockheed Martin who is a board member and a founding signatory of the Project for a New American Century’s mission statement, serves as the chairman of the Coalition to Liberate Iraq. In adopting the strategy promoted by this conservative network, the Bush administration has successfully pressed for more than $150 billion in new military spending and arms export subsidies since September 11, 2001, much of which is going to major weapons makers like Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and Northrop Grumman.”
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Iraq: Oil-For-Food; War No Matter What?

DENIS HALLIDAY
Halliday is former head of the UN oil-for-food program and a former UN Assistant Secretary General. The Security Council was expected to extend the oil-for-food program today. Halliday said today: “It’s good under the circumstances that the program is being extended for another six months — it keeps people alive — but it should not be necessary. We should have given the economy back to the Iraqis as a prelude to [the recent UN Security Council resolution] 1441. It would have made sense to get rid of the deadly economic sanctions as part of an agreement to ensure Iraqi compliance with the weapons inspectors. Right now, there’s no incentive for compliance — other than to avoid death. But the Iraqis seem to have it right when they say the U.S. is moving to attacking Iraq regardless of Iraqi compliance. An increase in the current U.S. bombings or an all-out attack or invasion will have devastating consequences for ordinary Iraqis; the ports might well get closed down, distribution systems get shut down. We have to look at the human consequences.” Halliday is available for a limited number of interviews.
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FRANCIS BOYLE
Boyle is professor of international law at the University of Illinois College of Law and is available for interviews regarding the recent UN Security Council resolution, particularly the argument advanced by the Bush administration that Iraqi firings in the “no-fly zones” constitute a violation of the recent resolution.

AS’AD ABUKHALIL
Author of the forthcoming book The House of Bush and the House of Saud, AbuKhalil is associate professor of political science at California State University at Stanislaus. He said today: “As critical as I’ve been of the Saudis, the current attack on them needs to be scrutinized. The ‘Karzai Syndrome’ is now operating in the Mideast. The U.S. will not tolerate any independence on the part of its clients. If you give the U.S. government 100 percent and disregard your population, you end up like [Afghan president Hamid] Karzai — you have to have U.S. bodyguards. The Saudis have been very pro-U.S., but now this is not sufficient and the U.S. is interfering in the Saudi succession struggle. Jordan on the other hand is doing everything the U.S. wants, so it’s getting $400 million — and it has massive protests.”

MAY KHEDER
Just after Bush’s scheduled signing of the Homeland Security Act this afternoon, attorney Kheder was among the scheduled speakers at a 2 p.m. news conference outside the White House in Lafayette Park. She said today: “The Homeland Security legislation flies in the face of our Fourth Amendment protections of ‘the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects…’ The Total Information Awareness Program, headed by John Poindexter, will be able to know what web sites we surf, what food we order, our bank transactions, etc. Ironically, this microscopic intrusion into our lives is being done in the name of freedom and democracy.”

For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167

Will Inspectors Be Used for Spying on Iraq Again?

As UN weapons inspectors arrived in Baghdad, Reuters reported that the head of the inspectors, Hans Blix, said he “could not rule out the possibility that there might be spies on his team. He added that any intelligence agents would be ordered off the group.” The following are portions of the public record and some analysts available for interviews:

“U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan has obtained what he regards as convincing evidence that United Nations arms inspectors helped collect eavesdropping intelligence used in American efforts to undermine the Iraqi regime, according to confidants who said he is deeply alarmed by the implications of the relationship for the world body.”
— From “Annan Suspicious Of UNSCOM Role,” Washington Post, Jan. 6, 1999
www.globalpolicy.org/security/issues/scomspy1.htm

“Have we facilitated spying? Are we spies? Absolutely not.”
— Richard Butler, former head of UNSCOM, quoted in the Boston Globe, Jan. 7, 1999
www.globalpolicy.org/security/issues/scomspy4.htm

“United States intelligence services infiltrated agents and espionage equipment for three years into United Nations arms control teams in Iraq to eavesdrop on the Iraqi military without the knowledge of the UN agency that it used to disguise its work, according to U.S. government employees and documents describing the classified operation.”
— From “U.S. Spied on Iraq Via UN,” Washington Post, March 2, 1999
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/inatl/daily/march99/unscom2.htm

SUSAN WRIGHT
Editor of the newly-released Biological Warfare and Disarmament: New Problems/New Perspectives, Wright authored the article “The Hijacking of UNSCOM” in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. She said today: “One of the major problems that plagued the inspections carried out by the UN Special Commission on Iraq before it left the country in December 1998 was the suspicion on the part of the Iraqis that it was being used for espionage by the United States. This was indeed confirmed by several journalists early in 1999 … A major challenge for Hans Blix, the chairman of UNSCOM’s successor, the UN Monitoring, Verification, and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), will be to avoid both the reality and the perception that this new agency is being similarly hijacked by the United States. Blix has said that UNMOVIC has 30 inspectors from the United States, more than any other country. If the Iraqis detect that the UN inspection organization is being used for espionage once again, the inspections place Iraq in a double bind. If Iraq goes along, it would know that its defenses are being scrutinized. If it resists, its resistance may be used as a trigger for war by the United States government. To avoid a crisis of this kind, it’s essential that the organizational lines between the mandate of the UN inspectors and the interests of individual states, especially the United States, be kept pristinely clear.”
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JIM NAURECKAS
Naureckas is editor of Extra!, the magazine of FAIR, which recently released a document titled “Spying in Iraq: From Fact to Allegation.”
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JAMES PAUL
Paul is executive director of the Global Policy Forum, which monitors policy-making at the UN.
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For more information, contact at the Institute for Public Accuracy:
Sam Husseini, (202) 347-0020; or David Zupan, (541) 484-9167